Wimbledon Odds

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Wimbledon Odds

Every summer, the greatest tennis players in the world brush arms with royalty at the All England Club for the first and only grass court major of the season. Dating back to 1877, Wimbledon is the oldest tennis tournament in the world and is perhaps the most prestigious of all, famous for their strict all-white dress code. Grass courts are the fastest surface in tennis, creating a unique challenge for the top players in the sport and also for the fans looking for the best tennis odds.

At Bodog Sportsbook, Wimbledon odds provide an opportunity to bet on the game, set or match. And if that’s not enough, you can even bet on each individual point as you follow the action on our tennis betting page. Do you have a hunch for the next tournament? Check out the sportsbook for fresh odds to win Wimbledon, any time of the year.

History of Wimbledon and Famous Players

Things have come a long way since 200 spectators witnessed Spencer Gore win the inaugural Wimbledon championship in 1877. Since moving their club to its current location in 1922, it hasn’t been all strawberries and cream. The All England Club has seen the championships interrupted twice due to world wars; centre court was even bombed in 1940 during the Second World War. The repairs were not completed until 1947, although the championships did resume in 1946, with 1,200 seats unavailable due to the damage.

It wasn’t until 1968 that professional tennis players were allowed to join the grand slam majors. Until that point, Wimbledon, and all other majors, permitted only amateurs to compete. 1968 signaled the beginning of the open era and it allowed some of tennis’ biggest personalities to shine on the royal stage. Colour television arrived in the 1970’s at the same time as some of the biggest stars, who are still recognizable today, such as John McEnroe, Jimmy Connors, Bjorn Borg, Chris Evert and Martina Navratilova, to name a few.

Connors, Bjorg and McEnroe continued their rivalries into the ‘80’s and saw some new foes enter the fray as well. Bjorg won five Wimbledon championships, while Mcenroe was a three-time champion; Jimmy Connors took home the title twice. Meanwhile on the women’s side, Navratilova won her ninth Wimbledon crown in 1990, a record that still stands today. The 90’s also saw Pete Sampras win seven Wimbledon titles, which was the men’s record at the time.

The 2000’s is when Roger Federer began his reign of terror on opponents. Since then, he’s won eight Wimbledon titles, which is a record on the men’s side. Venus and Serena Williams also debuted during this time and Venus won five Wimbledon championships, while her sister took home seven. During this period, we also saw Rafael Nadal and Novak Djokovic enter the men’s game, creating what is now known as the “big three,” along with Federer, in men’s tennis.

Since 2010, Djokovic has dominated the grass courts. He’s now tied with Sampras with seven championships, including the last four straight. Djokovic most recently defeated the fiery Australian Nick Kyrgios in four sets to win the 2022 title. On the women’s side Elena Rybakina won her first major title with a stellar run that few could have predicted.

Memorable Moments

Wimbledon has produced so many thrilling moments and matches you could spend days talking about them. In 2010, John Isner and Nicolas Mahut battled for over 11 hours across three days in what was eventually a victory for Isner in the fifth and deciding set. This match prompted a rule change that requires the fifth set to end with a super tiebreak.

Great Britain’s own Andy Murray ended a 77-year Wimbledon drought in 2013. He upset Djokovic, much to the delight of the home crowd. He won in three straight sets—a royal upset.

In 2019, Djokovic went head-to-head with Federer in a titanic battle of grass court champions. The match did not disappoint, unless you were a Federer fan. Djokovic won in five sets with the match clocking in at just under five hours—the longest Wimbledon final to date.

How to Bet on Wimbledon

While there’s no shortage of Wimbledon tennis odds, you’ll want to know how to navigate them in the sportsbook. The three most common bets include the spread, moneyline and total games. Looking at the Wimbledon final odds from 2022, Djokovic was a -350 favourite on the moneyline (risk $350 to win $100) and had a spread of 4.5 games, meaning you’d pick Djokovic to win by 5 or more total games in the match. The total games was set at 39.5, so you could have bet that the actual total games would go over or under 39.5. Below, you’ll see how the odds would appear in the sportsbook.

Spread Win Total
Novak Djokovic -4.5 (-110) -350 O 39.5 (-110)
Nick Kyrgios +4.5 (-110) +290 U 39.5 (-110)

Wimbledon winners odds aren’t always as lopsided as Djokovic’s. Just look at the 2022 women's champion, Elena Rybakina; she entered the final as a +115 underdog (risk $100 to win $115) and won the match, offering a nice payout to bettors.

Live betting is also available, making it possible to bet on every single point throughout a match. And for those who prefer to pick the tournament winner before it even begins, there is the Wimbledon futures market.

Wimbledon Betting FAQs

Q: What happens to my bet if the match ends with an injury?

A: Any uncompleted match, including injury, will be considered a draw and your bet will be returned, regardless of the score. The only exception is a disqualification. If a player is disqualified after a match has begun, the opponent will be considered the winner.

Q: What happens to my bet if the match is delayed or suspended due to weather?

A: Any delayed or suspended match will have action until the official conclusion of the match, regardless of the reason.

Q: Will my wager be returned if I place a futures bet on a player that doesn’t compete due to injury or otherwise?

A: Futures bets have action, regardless of whether the player competes or not.

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